I was a kid once, farther back than I want to admit. It was back in the days where television was analog and distorted by poor antenna reception. The invention of the VHS tape seemed like a miracle on par with curing leprosy. Unto this fragile and sheltered childhood entered the movie, Conan the Barbarian. In those 129 minutes, my life was changed.

 

I began to seek out fantasy wherever I could. I started, of course, with the Conan books by Robert E. Howard (and later L. Sprague de Camp and others). I went from there wherever I could, to J.R.R. Tolkien and Terry Brooks and beyond. No matter the story, I was hungry for more. But beyond wanting a rich fantasy life, I wanted to be like the heroes in the stories. As a kid, I’d play and pretend to slay dragons and rescue maidens. Eventually I became too old to do that (especially if I ever wanted to have a girlfriend), but I never forgot.

 

Wanting to be a hero is a part of almost every boy’s upbringing. I won’t dare to guess how many girls these days want to be heroines rather than princesses (my own daughter wants to be a mix of the two). I grew up learning everything I could to make me able to be that guy that can take care of himself and help others when the situation called for it – everything from first aid to joining the military to becoming a competitive powerlifter. I want to be the guy who a mugger will look at and decide not to challenge. I want to be the guy who can rip the door off the crashed car that’s on fire to get the people out. I want to be able to slay the dragon threatening the maiden.

 

With that in mind, my newest book is a high fantasy called Child of Fate. It’s the first book in the Blades of Leander series. The characters are as real as fictional characters can be, with quirks and weaknesses aplenty. They’ve got their talents and strengths just like a regular person, but what’s most important about them is that they’re identifiable.

 

These are the kinds of characters that we like because we understand them. We can remember feeling the same way at times. By living vicariously through the characters in Child of Fate we can answer the “what if” questions.

 

And isn’t it safer to read a book than it is to buy a sword and drive to the nearest national border and start attacking the border guards?

 

I don’t want you getting tazed or enduring a body cavity search, so please consider Child of Fate a safer and more entertaining alternative.

 

Early winters and distant cities make the northern reaches fit only for adventurous homesteaders. Alto is on the verge of becoming such a man when his father is ambushed by monstrous raiders from the mountains.

 

Determined to find help for his father Alto leaves his home behind and sets out with a group of adventurers tasked with learning the true nature of the raids. Help for his family grows more and more distant as the boy is swept up into a budding war with a neighboring nation and the threats of evil forces from the mountains.

 

A fiery-tempered princess from the eastern kingdom falls into Alto’s hands by twist of fate. The fate of two nations rests in their hands, provided they can keep them off of each other’s throats.

 

 

 

Pick up your copy of Child of Fate at any of these sites: 

Amazon 

Amazon UK

Barnes and Noble

Kobo

Smashwords

 

To learn more about Jason Halstead, visit his website to learn about him, his books, sign up for his newsletter, or check out some free samples of his books at http://www.booksbyjason.com.

 

Thanks for joining us today!

Until next time,

Ciao

JET

 

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